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Here are my Easter Eggs! I think they came out fabulously. The blue ones are from blueberries, the orange are yellow onion skins, the yellow are celery seed, and the purple are raspberries. It was actually pretty simple to do. In separate pots, I boiled about a cup of each item (except the celery seeds. I used about 3 tablespoons of them) in 1-2 cups of water until the water was dark enough. (About 20 minutes.) Then I strained the liquid into cups with about 2 tablespoons of vinegar. The eggs soaked in the water in the refridgerator for about two hours, and then I dried them on a rack.

 We had our celebration yesterday since Ryan has to work on Sunday. Wesley had an awesome time hunting eggs in the yard. Ryan took him out front while I hid them in the backyard. Then I went tearing around the house like a lunatic shouting that I’d just seen the Easter Bunny hopping around the backyard. When questioned by my mom about the Easter Bunny, Wesley told her that the Easter Bunny was blue and was a girl. (I love that he has no pre-conceived notions about “boy colors” and “girl colors.”) I think that’s funny because when I was about four, I SWORE I’d seen the Easter Bunny running out of my bedroom, and he was pink, and a boy. I can still remember seeing him, and I can still see that big fluffy pink butt and white tail scurrying out the door.

My little handsewn bunny wasn’t so great. In fact, he has a massive hole in his side, and his little stuffing is coming out because I didn’t finish it. I gave it to Wesley half-finished, telling him that the Easter Bunny was a major slacker, but Mommy would fix it for him.

The playdough was a hit, although I didn’t have any food coloring so I had to use another recipe, one that called for Kool-Aid. Here’s the recipe I used:

Kool-Aid Play Dough

2 1/2 to 3 cups flour
2 cups boiling water with 1 package Kool-aid (any flavor)
3 tablespoons corn oil
1/2 cup salt
1 tablespoon alum

Mix ingredients and knead with flour (may take up to 1 extra cup). Use more if the dough draws moisture in high humidity. Keeps well, has a nice fragrance and is very colorful and very flexible.

By the way, the recipe never mentions how long you should wait to start kneading it. I recommend waiting a long time. Did you know that boiling water is hot?

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